The Mindful Dietitian
Defusing Shame & Blame with Nikki Estep

Defusing Shame & Blame with Nikki Estep

May 14, 2020

Nikki Estep on how Emotion Focussed Family Therapy (EFFT) provides a powerful modality for defusing shame and blame, and promoting food and body healing in Eating Disorder Treatment.

In this episode, Nikki shares how she began working in this space and her experience moving to private practice, she introduces us to Emotion Focused Family Therapy (EFFT) as a therapeutic approach for dietitians in eating disorder treatment; she walks us through the EFFT modules, demonstrates how the model addresses self-blame, shame and avoidance and shows us how it may sound in practice, she shares how EFFT has the ability to address clinician blocks and what she has learnt about herself through practicing this family inclusive approach. 

Here Fi and Nikki speak about:

  • How Nikki began working with adolescents in the eating disorder treatment space and her evolution into private practice. 
  • An introduction to EFFT; Emotion Focused Family Therapy:
    • How Nikki first heard about it as a therapeutic approach,
    • What the approach aims to do,
    • How the model provides a shift in ED treatment.
    • What EFFT sounds like in practice and how it activates the limbic system. 
    • The EFFT modules; Nikki walks us through them and explains how Janet Treasure’s animal models are incorporated.
    • Nikki also demonstrates how EFFT addresses self-blame, shame and avoidance for the young person / client, for the parents and within the family system.
    • Clinician blocks; how the model provides an opportunity to address blocks for clinicians, which can then be taken to supervision. 
  • What Nikki has learnt about herself and her work with others through using EFFT as a therapeutic approach in dietetics.

 

 

As mentioned in the podcast:

Resource: The Why of Parental and Caregiver Involvement in the Treatment of Mental Health Issues - EFFT

 

About Nikki:

 

Find out more:

Website

Facebook

Instagram

Weight Inclusive Cancer Care with Tamar Rothenberg

Weight Inclusive Cancer Care with Tamar Rothenberg

May 4, 2020

From Surviving to Thriving; Body Inclusive Cancer Care with Tamar Rothenberg

 

Tamar shares how she connects, collaborates and supports her local dietetic community in LA, becoming an oncology specialist and working with thrivers, why this work is so important to her, mixed messages and weight stigma in the oncology space, how dietitians can help navigate intersecting ideas and address their clients fears around food, how radical acceptance and body trust can support thrivers long-term and how we can work to ensure weight inclusive care in oncology spaces.

Here Fi and Tamar speak about:

 

  • Living in LA; collaborating and connecting with her local dietetic community and how they support each other.  

 

  • How Tamar became an oncology specialist (oncology nutrition), her work with thrivers and why this work means so much to her.
  • The mixed messages encountered in the oncology space and how they are being interpreted by people in treatment / post-treatment.
  • Weight stigma, from experience and observation, at screening / pre-treatment, in active treatment and post-treatment. 
  • Navigating the intersecting idea that “I should be grateful that there is now no evidence of cancer” BUT “I feel angry / pissed AND I don’t feel well or at home in my body”.
  • How dietitians can address client fears around food in helpful ways when going through treatment / post-treatment and the power of validation and acknowledgement in this space.
  • How different worlds can collide in healing.
  • Why radical acceptance, body connection and body trust can support thrivers long-term.
  • The importance of understanding and accepting that what might be helpful for one client, may not be helpful for another. 
  • The most important core messages we need to share with our colleagues to ensure weight inclusive care in oncology spaces.

As mentioned in the podcast:

  • Women Rowing North: Navigating Life’s Currents and Flourishing As We Age by Mary Pipher

More about Tamar: 

Tamar Rothenberg, MS, RDN, specializes in nutrition for breast cancer thrivers in her private practice in Los Angeles. She has a Certificate of Training in Vegetarian Nutrition. She cuts through confusing nutrition information and uses intuitive eating, body trust, and plant foods to get your power back. She’s an adjunct professor of nutrition at Touro College and University. Most recently, she co-authored the study, Coping with Cancer in the Kitchen.

 

De-Experting, Unlearning & Weight Inclusive Nutrition in Practice with Laura Thomas

De-Experting, Unlearning & Weight Inclusive Nutrition in Practice with Laura Thomas

April 18, 2020

Laura Thomas on the process of de-experting, unlearning and weight inclusive MNT for Dietitians and Nutritionists

 

In this episode, Laura shares about her book; Just Eat It, to include getting the idea off the ground, the writing and publishing processes and evolving since publication, also the frameworks and principles that dietitians and nutritionists may find difficult when first moving to the non-diet / HAES & IE paradigm from the traditional weight-centric models and how they can overcome them and developing Weight-Inclusive guides for health professionals and clients; more about them and where you can find them.

Here Fi and Laura discuss:

 

  • Flipping the tables on Laura for a round of "Quick-Fire Action" (a fun, introductory activity which Laura uses to begin her Don’t Salt My Game Podcast)
  • Laura’s Book, Just Eat It;
  • How the book came to be written.
  • The writing and publishing process.
  • And changing and evolving as a health professional and human-being over time.

 

  • What dietitians and nutritionists may find difficult when first starting to adopt non-diet / HAES / intuitive eating frameworks and principles and practices that can help; 

    • The importance of de-experting and unlearning and using person-centred care to flick the ‘fixing’ instinct and uncover our client’s values.
    • Slowing down the intuitive eating principles and starting where it makes sense for the client. 
    • Why it might be helpful to establish a tool kit of coping skills for clients before commencing IE and where acceptance and commitment therapy fits in the process.
  • Weight-Inclusive Guides for dietitians, nutritionists and clients produced by the London Centre for Intuitive Eating; their aim, putting them into practice and where you can find them. 

As mentioned in the podcast:

More about Laura:

Laura established LCIE in 2017 to help support clients who have a difficult relationship with food and their body. She has a passion for delivering inclusive, trauma informed, and person-centred care for all bodies. She draws upon different therapeutic and counselling skills to support her clients in their recovery from disordered eating, chronic dieting, and body dissatisfaction. She also incorporates different health care frameworks into her work, such as Health and Every Size Ⓡ, Intuitive Eating, and Body Image Healing. Much of her work focusses on advocacy and reducing weight-based discrimination within the nutrition profession. Laura takes a collaborative approach to working with clients, recognising that they are the experts of their own bodies and experiences. Her advice and recommendations are not didactic, rather she helps guide and support clients to reconnect with their bodies. 

In January 2019, Laura published her 1st book with Bluebird Books: Just Eat It: How Intuitive Eating Can Help You Get Your Shit Together Around Food.

 

Find out more:

Podcast

Book

Website

Instagram

Twitter

Pinterest

London Centre for Intuitive Eating

Fierce, Fat and Saving Lives with Victoria Welsby

Fierce, Fat and Saving Lives with Victoria Welsby

April 1, 2020

Victoria Welsby on how we can be better humans and health professionals by interrogating our own biases & fat phobia. Buckle in for the real talk!

 

Victoria shares why the word fat has been reclaimed in the body positive and fat positive communities, using the word fat; who gets too, when it might be used and its impact, how we can be better humans and health professionals by removing certain words from our vocabulary, ways we can call in other health professionals, interrogating our own biases and avoiding the shame spiral, seeking support as a professional / activist in the non-diet, body positive / fat positive spaces, Victoria’s book ‘Fierce Fatty’ and other must read books for 2020 and so much more!

Here Fi and Victoria speak about:

    • Launching onto the scene in a big way and sharing insight into her life as a guest on the Chrissy Harrison Food Psych Podcast – an important listen, find it here!
    • Reclamation of the word fat;
      • Why the body positive and fat positive communities have reclaimed it.
      • Who gets to use it, when it might be used and its life-changing-life-saving impact.
    • The ‘o’ words NO health professional (or anyone) should use and why removing these words from your vocabulary (and brain) is incredible!
    • Ways we can call-in health professionals that are still using the ‘o’ words i.e. do you want to be on the right side of history??
    • Why making the effort to interrogate our own bias really matters and why we need to avoid getting caught in the shame spiral.

 

  • Seeking support as a feminist / doctor / dietitian / health professional / fat activist / body positive activist in this paradigm. 
  • What we can look out for as signals that we need to do some work as non-diet dietitians and why you should claim the ‘Fat Positive and Anti-Diet Dietitian’ title.
  • Must read books for 2020, which of course includes Victoria’s new book (YES!!) and why she evolved to become the Fierce Fatty (from BAMPOWLIFE).

 

As mentioned in the podcast:

More about Victoria: Fi to input.

Find out more:

Website

Instagram

Podcast

Twitter

Facebook

LinkedIn

Pinterest

Redefining Self Care & The Power of The Collective Breath with Marci Evans

Redefining Self Care & The Power of The Collective Breath with Marci Evans

March 24, 2020

At this unprecedented time of chaos and uncertainty, we seek connection and care in ways that may feel really difficult. As health practitioners, we too can be caught up in what these events mean for us, our families, communities and the world.

Here, Marci and I have an important conversation about what “self care” really means - perhaps in even unconventional ways - and how we can become more attuned, receptive, grounded and creative when tough moments, days and times arise.

About Marci:

Marci is a Food and Body Image Healer®. She has dedicated her career to counseling, supervising, and teaching in the field of eating disorders. She is a Certified Eating Disorder Registered Dietitian and Supervisor, certified Intuitive Eating Counselor and Certified ACSM personal trainer. In addition to her group private practice and three adjunct teaching positions, Marci launched an online eating disorders training for dietitians in 2015 and co-directs a specialized eating disorder internship at Simmons College. She volunteers for a number of national eating disorder organizations including the iaedp certification committee and is serving as an eating disorder resource professional for The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.  She has spoken locally and nationally at numerous conferences and media outlets. She loves social media so tweet her @marciRD, follow her on Facebook and Instagram, and check out her blog at www.marciRD.com/blog.

Marci's Online Courses

 

 

 

 

What Dietitians can learn from the world of Therapy with Sarah Peck

What Dietitians can learn from the world of Therapy with Sarah Peck

March 6, 2020

What can Dietitians, and Dietetics, learn from the world of Therapy with Sarah Peck, NZRD

Sarah shares the decision behind her transition from dietetics to psychotherapy, experiencing burn out and finding the non-diet community, feeling disconnected with her story and body and finding opportunities to reconnect and disentangle, how the dietetic pathway / study could be improved with therapeutic elements, why we need to actively seek out feedback from marginalised folks and communities in our work (and some helpful examples), how we can ask for feedback respectfully, navigating weight stigma within university content as a student and the power of the student voice. 

Here Fi and Sarah speak about:

  • Becoming fast friends and some fun adventures they have shared together. 
  • Sarah’s transition from dietetics to psychotherapy;
    • The decision behind the move – the nudges and natural progression. 
    • Burning out in a weight centric framework and finding the non-diet community and weight inclusive paradigms.  
    • Feeling disconnected with her own story and body and the importance of finding opportunities to reconnect and disentangle ourselves.
    • Her experience as a therapeutic student studying in New Zealand.
  • The core, therapeutic elements that should be included in all dietetic pathways/study;
    • Reflexivity; what it is and how it can help us to consistently show up for our clients.  
    • Social Justice; seeing dietetics and health models through the social justice lens so we can leave behind assumptions, change the narrative and accept and embrace complexities.
  • The importance of inclusion and actively seeking out feedback from people who experience marginalisation when our work as dietitians impacts them and how we can ask for this support respectfully – Sarah gives us some real-life examples!
  • Question and Answer time – Sarah and Fi provide some helpful advice to a student dietitian in response to a recent Instagram post on weight stigma and speaking up as a student – see it here!
  • Power dynamics at university and the power of the student voice.

As mentioned in the podcast:

More about Sarah: 

Sarah is a human first but also happens to be a weight inclusive NZRD training to be a psychotherapist. She lives in Auckland, New Zealand with her family. Sydney, Australia is her second home, where she lived for many years, studied dietetics and had her three daughters.

Sarah has spent her dietetic career so far working in private practice and specialising in eating disorder recovery. She has a keen interest in how chronic health conditions impact relationships with self, body and food in both childhood and adulthood, fuelled by her own lived experience of a chronic health condition, raising two daughters with coeliac disease and the gifts of wisdom shared by her clients. Outside of private practice she has been passionate about working with organisations that support adolescents and young people with cancer and teacher education around age appropriate nutrition and health messaging for children

Find out more:

Body Balance Nutrition NZ

 

Defining Recoveries in Biased Systems with Andrea La Marre

Defining Recoveries in Biased Systems with Andrea La Marre

February 18, 2020

Andrea La Marre on the complexity of defining recoveries in biased systems of care.

In this episode, Andrea shares her interesting pathway to become an academic, speaker and activist, the impact of problematic systems in eating disorder treatment, how we can be better health professionals through self-monitoring, when it’s helpful to speak up and when it is not, why we need to work from a social justice-culturally appropriate-trauma-based care lens, the complexities involved in defining ‘recovery’, ‘recovery’ as a healthcare professional, why using plurals in recoveries can extend our understanding and so much more.

Here, we discuss:

  •  Sneaking Andrea onto The Mindful Dietitian podcast as a non-dietitian! - Watch this space as the podcast is switched up for 2020 to include guests with lived experiences and knowledge that is essential to our work as inclusive, client centred, non-diet dietitians! 
  • Andrea’s interesting pathway from acknowledging her own privilege in accessing eating disorder treatment, to completing her a masters and PhD in eating disorder recoveries, to her work as a lecturer, researcher, speaker, activist, and filmmaker.

  • The problematic systems which lie within in eating disorder treatment, hindering access and inclusiveness. 

  • How ongoing self-monitoring and tuning into our biases can help us become better health professionals. 

  • When is it helpful to speak about our own experiences and when is it not, and why lifting the voices and experiences of those most marginalised doesn’t make ours less valid.

  • The importance of working from a social justice, culturally appropriate, trauma-based care lens to improve societal systems for all.

  • The call to be always ‘helping’ people, complexities involved in defining ‘recovery’ and ‘recovery’ / ‘recoveries’ as a healthcare professional.

  • The papers and work Andrea is currently jiving on.

  • Using plurals to understand the multiply, non-singular and non-linear pathways of recoveries and how it can also apply to other communities and experiences.

  • Attending and presenting at the International Conference on Eating Disorders - ICED 2020 Sydney (ANZAED and AED) in June.

 

As mentioned in the podcast:

Published work of Dr Andrea LaMarre

International Conference on Eating Disorders - ICED 2020 Sydney (ANZAED and AED)

 

More about Andrea:

Andrea LaMarre is a researcher, writer, speaker, and aspiring filmmaker from Canada living in Auckland, New Zealand. She currently works at Massey University as a lecturer in critical health psychology. She obtained her PhD in 2018 at the University of Guelph, where she used qualitative and arts-based approaches to explore eating disorders recoveries from the perspectives of people in recovery and their chosen supporters. In her spare time, she watches really bad TV, reads young adult fiction, and spends entirely too much time on Twitter. She can also be found hiking with her husband or attending too many conferences

 

Connect with Andrea

Twitter

Instagram

Website

 

A history of HAES & effective allyship with Kimmie Singh

A history of HAES & effective allyship with Kimmie Singh

January 31, 2020

Kimmie Singh on the history of HAES and the importance of effective allyship in body liberation work.

 

Kimmie shares her background as a fat dietitian and fat activist, what it was like for her navigating the traditional weight-centric education route as a HAES informed student, what Allyship is and how you can be a good ally, the history of the HAES movement, tips for speaking up and how to communicate thoughtfully in this paradigm, her vision for the future of dietetics and how she has evolved to become The Body Positive Dietitian. 

Here Fi and Kimmie speak about:

  • First meeting and then crossing paths at the Weight-Inclusive Nutrition & Dietetics (WIND) Symposium, where Kimmie was a key-note speaker!
  • Kimmie’s background; what makes her special and her intention to create awareness around body diversity and fat activism in the health care profession.
  • Kimmie’ experience as a HAES informed student as she went through the traditional nutrition and dietetic education route.
  • Allyship; what it is and how you can be a good ally by considerately stepping aside and being thoughtful of safety.
  • The history of the HAES movement.
  • Tips for speaking up as a student and not expecting the person in the marginalised body to do it for you.
  • Being brave in your branding and what this means for those in marginalised bodies.
  • Thoughtful communication: how to discuss bodies without pathologizing and centring weight.
  • Kimmie’s vision for the future of dietetics; de-experting and getting uncomfortable.
  • The future for Kimmie and evolving to become The Body Positive Dietitian.

 

As mentioned in the podcast:

The history of HAES from the ASDAH blog;

Part 1 - Introduction

Part 2 - 1970’s & 1980’s

Part 3 – The early 1990’s

Part 4 – The mid-to-late 1990’s

Part 5 – The late 1990’s

 

More about Kimmie:

Kimmie Singh is a fat Registered Dietitian based in New York City. She completed her Master of Science in Nutrition at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro and her Dietetic Internship from The City University of New York-Hunter College. Kimmie is an associate at LK Nutrition, a Health at Every Size private practice that supports clients who are trying to heal their relationship with food and body. She also presents and consults on weight stigma in dietetics and dietetics training. Kimmie is a believer in kindness, compassion, and the power of advocacy. Learn more about Kimmie at www.bodypositivedietitian.com or on instagram @bodypositive_dietitian. 

Connect with Kimmie

Website

Instagram

Twitter

Facebook

LinkedIn

The pervasive culture of under-fuelling in sport with Leslie Schilling

The pervasive culture of under-fuelling in sport with Leslie Schilling

January 14, 2020

Leslie Schilling on the pervasive culture of under-fuelling in sports and performance & raising kids who can call out diet culture!

 

Here, Fi & Leslie talk about:

  • Life, work and play in Las Vegas – keep up with Leslie’s weekend adventures on Instagram; “there is so much to do in Vegas off the strip!”
  • What it’s like working with athletes, performers and artists in Las Vegas, particularly the performers from Cirque du Soleil!
  • How Leslie supports her culturally diverse clients to adapt to life in the US and navigate diet culture through their interesting and demanding schedules.
  • The culture and promotion of under fuelling in sports.
  • How to help clients push back against under fuelling and the response from clients when they are given permission to eat.
  • Tips on how to screen for under fuelling and restriction when working with athletes / performers – find out the important questions to ask!
  • Interoceptive and somatic awareness, encouraging nutrition intuition and finding a common ground with coaches.
  • How under fuelling can become an entrenched behaviour unintentionally and innocently, not just through disordered eating
  • The culture that keeps us underfeed and what the salmon would do? (hint* swim upstream and dodge the diet culture BS!)
  • The famous Lunch Box Card inspired by Dr. Katja Rowell and The Responsive Feeding Therapy Conference to take place in May 2020.

 

As mentioned in the podcast:

Born to Eat book by Leslie Schilling

Las Vegas Cirque du Soleil

IOC consensus statement on relative energy deficiency in sport (RED-S): 2018 update

The Mary Cain Story

The Feeding Doctor – Dr Katja Rowell

Responsive Feeding Therapy Conference May 2020

 

More about Leslie:

Leslie Schilling, MA, RDN, CEDRD-S owns a Las Vegas-based coaching practice, specializing in nutrition counseling for families, those of all ages with disordered eating concerns, and professional athletes and performers. In addition to running her practice, Leslie serves as a performance nutrition consultant for Cirque du Soleil® and an eating disorder specialist and supervisory consultant for eating disorder treatment centers in Nevada. With her warm, compassionate, and entertaining personality, Leslie been featured in media outlets like Women’s Health, Self, Pregnancy Magazine, The Yoga Journal, Bicycling, BuzzFeed, the Huffington Post, US News & World Report, and on HGTV. When she’s not spending time with her family, you can find her spreading non-diet messages to her clients and speaking platforms across the nation. Leslie is passionate about educating ministry, military, health, medical, and fitness professionals about the harms of typical dieting behaviors. You may know Leslie best as the creator of the Born To Eat® approach and co-author of the award-winning book, Born To Eat.

 

Connect with Leslie

Website

Instagram

Twitter

Facebook

Pinterest

The evolution of Dietetic practice & tipping points with Jenna Hollenstein

The evolution of Dietetic practice & tipping points with Jenna Hollenstein

January 3, 2020

Jenna Hollenstein on compassion and witnessing the evolution of Dietetic practice, asking "is this a tipping point?"

Jenna shares witnessing a new mood, observations of the current tipping point, the importance of compassion as we evolve as clinicians and as we witness the evolution of others, what compassion is and isn’t and how we embrace it, mindfulness and meditation; the notion of acceptance, making connections and a new training opportunity available for dietitians. 

Here Fi and Jenna speak about:

  • Living in NYC; its overstimulating nature and rich diversity with many opportunities for observation.
  • Attending the 2019 FNCE; ‘The Superbowl for American Dietitians’ and its significantly different presence.
  • The current tipping point within the dietetic community and profession - the hunger for IE and HAES exposure from students and dietitians early on in their careers.
  • Why its important to enact self-compassion and not turn to self-aggression as we evolve and change.
  • The misconceptions of self-compassion; 
  • What it really is and what it isn’t.
  • The need to balance feminine and masculine qualities.
  • How we can embrace self-compassion through this environmental shift by being conscious and aware of our evolution and the evolution of others. 
  • Compassion VS Idiot Compassion; understanding the complexities of the human experience and the need to call out / call in – and knowing it’s not easy! 
  • Mindfulness in practice through connections and the notion of acceptance.
  • Teaching the Open Heart Project Meditation Instructor Training with Susan Piver and a new meditation instructor course just for dietitians – watch this space!

 

As mentioned in the podcast:

FNCE 2019: 247. Intuitive Eating: What Every Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Needs to Know

Dr Kristin Neff – Self Compassion

Open Heart Project Meditation Instructor Training with Susan Piver

 

Find Jenna:

Website

Instagram

Twitter

Facebook

YouTube

LinkedIn

 

More about Jenna:

Jenna Hollenstein, MS, RDN, CDN, is a non-diet dietitian who helps people struggling with chronic dieting, disordered eating, and eating disorders. She uses a combination of Intuitive Eating, mindfulness techniques, and meditation to help her clients move toward greater peace, health, and wellness. Jenna’s private practice is located in New York City where she consults with clients in person and virtually. Jenna is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) and a Certified Dietitian Nutritionist (CDN) in New York State. She has a Bachelors degree in Nutrition from Penn State, a Masters degree in Nutrition from Tufts University, is a Certified Intuitive Eating Counselor and an Open Heart Project meditation guide. In 2018, Jenna joined the board of The Center for Mindful Eating. Jenna teaches at mindfulness retreats in the United States and France. She has been featured in U.S. News & World ReportHealthMindfulVogueElleGlamour, and Fox News. Jenna is the author of Understanding Dietary Supplements, a handy guide to the evaluation and use of vitamins, minerals, herbs, and botanicals for both consumers and clinicians, and the memoir Drinking to Distraction. Her third book, Eat to Love: A Mindful Guide to Transforming Your Relationship with Food, Body, and Life, was published in January, 2019.